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Temperature Compensation Sensor for the HR series of sensors
  • MB7955............HR-MaxTemp PCB and 1 inch of Heat Shrink
  • MB7956............HR-MaxTemp Cable. Purchasable by the Foot
  • MB7957............HR-MaxTemp PCB, 1in. of Heat Shrink, and 3ft. of cable
  • MB7958............Fully Assembled HR-MaxTemp with 3ft of cable
  • MB7972............Fully Assembled HR-MaxTemp with 20ft of cable
HR-MaxTemp, MB7955 HR-MaxTemp Cable, MB7956 HR-MaTemp Kit, MB7957 HR-MaxTemp, HR-MaxTemp Assembled, MB7958 HR-MaxTemp, HR-MaxTemp Assembled, MB7959
$4.95 each

HR‑MaxTemp PCB and Heat Shrink
$3.00 ea.

(Order per foot
i.e. 1 ft = qty 1)
$9.95 each

HR-MaxTemp PCB, heat Shrink, and 3 feet of cable
$29.95 each

Assembled HR‑MaxTemp with 3 feet of cable
$49.95 each

Assembled HR‑MaxTemp with 20 feet of cable
For larger quantities, please contact MaxBotix Inc. for pricing.


Product Description


The HR-MaxTemp sensor when connected to the HR-MaxSonar line of sensors allows for automatic temperature compensation of speed of sound changes over temperature.

The HR-MaxTemp is designed to be used alongside the HR-MaxSonar sensors. The HR-MaxSonar sensor upon power-up will automatically detect an attached temperature sensor and begin to apply temperature compensation for the speed of sound changes to all range outputs.


The HR‑MaxTemp is compatible with the following sensor lines:

  • HRLV‑MaxSonar‑EZ
  • HRXL‑MaxSonar‑WRS
  • HRXL‑MaxSonar‑WR
  • 4-20HR‑MaxSonar‑WR
  • SCXL‑MaxSonar‑WRS
  • SCXL‑MaxSonar‑WR
  • 4-20SC‑MaxSonar‑WR

Product Documentation

Author: Bob Gross  Date: 11-24-2015
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Author: Scott Wielenberg  Date: 11-18-2015
Types of Material When designing an application that places an ultrasonic sensor in a visible location, users may wish to conceal the sensor for aesthetic purposes. Additionally, users may desire to hide the sensor to discourage individuals from tampering with the sensor. This article covers several methods that you may use to conceal a sensor. Click here for full article.
Author: Cody Carlson  Date: 11-03-2015
Low versus High Resolution targets When it comes down to it, you purchase a rangefinder for the range readings. The success of an application may hinge upon knowing the exact location of a target. However, a sensor may report one meter even if the target is not exactly one meter away from the sensor. Sensor specifications, such as resolution, precision, and accuracy, help us understand what wiggle room and error will be present in a reading. Click here for full article.
Author: Scott Wielenberg  Date: 10-13-2015
Design Cycle Welcome to the review of the Design Cycle Guide. This article provides the summary of each of the phases with links to the respective articles for more detailed information. Click here for full article.
Written By: Cody Carlson  Date: 10-08-2015
Acoustic Types All targets reflect sound to a varying degree. Ultrasonic sensors use the speed of sound to calculate distance based on the time it takes for an echo to return from a target. More simply put, our sensors detect distance much like a bat or dolphin does. Click here for full article.
Author: Nicole Smith  Date: 08-17-2015
Inc 5000 Overall Seal Inc. Magazine Unveils 34th Annual List of America's Fastest Growing Private Companies–the Inc. 5000. MaxBotix Inc., Ranks No. 3616 with Three–Year Sales Growth of 87%. Click here for full article.
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